Kenyatta becomes a leader

This post is to announce that I am returning to leadership within Unitarian Universalism. Many years ago I chaired the racial justice committee. That committee promoted diversity, organized a Kwanzaa event, organized a drum circle and tried to change the church culture. Unfortunately, the committee seemed to attract the same core group of people. I underwent a personal transformation that led to a divorce, and the development of a whole new career as a certified peer specialist. There were years in which I was barely active.

The committee was dissolved but in recent years new people have entered the church with a different set of ideas. One person in particular Mary Devitt has been a catalyst under the banner of Black Lives Matter. Mary has involved the First Unitarians in several events, most recently organizing a showing of a film about the 53206 neighborhood, which focused on the impact of mass incarceration on the low income community. She was also in the campaigns to change police practices after the killings of black men by police in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa. Her most recent accomplishment was a workshop on racial justice at Alverno College that featured Chris Crass, a speaker from Kentucky. Over 350 people attended the event which was organized with a remarkable coalition.

Mary has been a sort of one woman committee within the church which lead to her being given a designation as a change agent. At the same time Mary recognized that it was problematic for her to be in charge of black lives matter. She has what she calls her “cabal” that she can pull together on an ad hoc basis to achieve goals. However, that could easily lead to burn out. So we began a conversation this week about my leading a transformation of the black lives matter cabal into a committee to carry on the things she has started.

I have agreed to take this on at a time of turmoil within the Unitarian Universalist movement. There is more happening every day and it demands that someone from Milwaukee help give direction. The UU is a place where I feel comfortable sometimes. When my allies aren’t present and people ask me, where have I been, I feel like becoming invisible. That needs to change. A lot needs to change. Let the drum speak.

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How to make black lives matter at a white church?

smiling black girl

 

I have been noticing that some white churches post signs and organize events that proclaim Black Lives Matter. Today I was at the First Unitarian Society in Milwaukee for the first time in several months and a couple I had seen during my last visit was there. It so happened that the husband is an expert on gang interventions I had heard about many years ago. His wife, who seems to be one of those people who creates a niche for herself wherever she goes, is one of a group within the Unitarian Universalists who are of a social justice ministry. In the church, she is doing Black Lives Matter events and it just so happened that today they had organized a silent witness.

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I joined in representing formerly young gifted and black individuals. Most of the responses from passers by were positive. In addition, today’s donations were being shared with an organization that works with inner city youths. This is part of being allies. But how does this sound to you as a reader? How are mostly white organizations and churches witnessing? Do black lives matter to you or are you irritated by the expression? Do you yell back All Lives Matter twice as loudly? Who is it you are attempting to drown out?

Although my job is not specifically to fight racial oppression, African-Americans and other people of color with mental illness are at extremely high risk when they encounter the police. With our help, perhaps they will live longer, more productive lives. Their lives will matter, too.

 

 

What more is there to say?

black woman with blue eyes

 

 

This has been one of those horrible weeks where one looks out into the city and sees chaos. I am not going to repeat everything here because if you have been awake you have seen the murders of two black men and the equally horrendous murders of police yesterday. It seems that we are making the same move over and over. A black person encounters the police for seemingly innocuous reasons: routine traffic stop, for example, and the police officer becomes unusually aggressive. When the black person attempts to respond he or she is either pulled out of their vehicle or shot while still in the car. The person may also be tackled, pepper sprayed and shot dead. The family becomes angry and asks for justice for their loved one. There is an investigation, very rarely a trial and even there there is no conviction for the taking of black lives on the street.

The president is often part of this scenario as white racists claim that having a black president has divided the country. One former congressman even threatened to kill President Obama and then deleted it. This most recent tragedy was twisted by the fact a one or more snipers in Dallas took advantage of a peaceful protest to begin opening fire, killing and wounding.

So, those are the facts. The NRA and the politicians they own will saw, how dare anyone try to limit unfettered access to deadly weapons, high powered magazines and everything that goes with it. One possible answer came during the press conference held by the Dallas chief of police and the mayor who mentioned that their police department is trained to de-escalate conflict. That was part of the sadness that they must be feeling. They want to be able to protect citizen’s rights. That sounds like a reasonable and sound approach to take.

It is not time for war, as the New York Post screamed. It is time for comfort, sorrow and solutions. Black lives matter is not about murder. It’s about freedom and dignity. We want the police to treat us the way you would want to be treated.

Trayvon Martin shot in Cold Blood and Geraldo said it’s the hoodie’s fault

Trayvon Martin Protest - Sanford
Trayvon Martin Protest - Sanford (Photo credit: werthmedia)
Geraldo Rivera
Geraldo Rivera (Photo credit: Island Capture Photography)

It’s all so clear what Geraldo Rivera, former reporter means to say when he tells us that we have a totally one-sided view of the tragic killing of Trayvon Martin. For many of us, the word killing should be changed to murder. George Zimmerman, a  man armed with a gun and fueled by racist hatred stalked Trayvon as he walked down the street in his father’s neighborhood. Trayvon was considered dangerous and possibly on drugs, in Zimmerman’s eyes. Zimmerman was going to protect the community from this young boy wearing a hoodie.If black youths would just stop wearing those hoodies, things would be different and white men could see them differently.That’s what we are being told by an idiot with an audience. Like the commercial said, a mind is a terrible thing to waste and Geraldo  has wasted his. Geraldo’s son said it best when he declared he was ashamed of his father.

Wikipedia: Y is the twenty-fifth letter in the ISO basic Latin alphabet and represents either a vowel or a consonant in English.

And so, Bo’s Killer Goes Free

Today it was announced that the killer of Bo Morrison, a young man who stood on the wrong porch at the wrong time became a victim of the right to defend one’s castle. In a news report, it was discovered that the 20 year-old had been drinking. Since he had been at an underage drinking party that was hardly surprising. But as I suggested in my earlier blog entry Judge, Jury and Executioner, there was no evidence that Bo had done anything except try to avoid being found. It was a matter of his bad judgment.

Before I was old enough to drink, I bought some gin and cola with a couple of friends and drank until I threw up. That pretty much cured me of alcoholism. there’s noting worse than shame, guilt and a lousy stomach to make you realize this is not where you want to be. We were in our neighborhood, we were young black boys and the judgment was faced was that of our parents.

I think that’s the way it should be. I would have loved to hear Bo’s parents discuss with him their hopes and dreams for him and why he needed to remain alcohol-free. But, unfortunately thy never got the chance.

I have read stories of teen underage drinking parties where no one was killed. In fact, in white communities, the police are not always guaranteed entry to check identifications and determine who who should be ticketed.

I never met Bo Morrison and his family. I probably would never have heard about them if Bo had  not been killed in a rush to judgment. There is a vast difference between a young unarmed male on a porch and one who poses an imminent danger requiring an armed response. What the reckless legislators and governor of Wisconsin Scott Walker have done is to leave it up to any Mary, Jane, Harry and Doe to decide on a split second whether that difference matters.

Bo Morrison should have been alive and well and studying today and the man who killed him should have had reason to pause and wonder, is this the right thing to do?